Social Psychology

Social Psychology

Couples argue 312 times a year

Mostly on Thursday at 8pm for ten minutes

Social Psychology

Respect Matters More Than Money for Happiness in Life

New research suggests that overall happiness in life is more related to how much you are respected and admired by those around you, not to the status that comes from how much money you have stashed in your bank account.

Social Psychology

Empathy Doesn't Extend Across the Political Aisle

ScienceDaily (Apr. 2, 2012) — When we try to put ourselves in someone else's shoes, we usually go all the way, assuming that they feel the same way we do. But a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, finds that we have limits: we don't extend this projection to people who have different political views, even under extreme circumstances.

Social Psychology

Study: Women Prefer Chefs Over Lovers

Sure, a healthy sex life is great. But it’s nothing compared to a cheese soufflé.

Social Psychology

Traumatic Experiences May Make You Tough

Your parents were right: Hard experiences may indeed make you tough. Psychological scientists have found that, while going through many experiences like assault, hurricanes, and bereavement can be psychologically damaging, small amounts of trauma may help people develop resilience.

Social Psychology

Social Networks make you more cooperative

Rand, a post-doctoral fellow in Harvard’s Department of Psychology and a Lecturer in Human Evolutionary Biology, is the lead author of a new paper, which found that dynamic, complex social networks encourage their members to be friendlier and more cooperative, with the possible payoff coming in an expanded social sphere, while selfish behavior can lead to an individual being shunned from the group and left – literally – on their own.

Social Psychology

Babies Show Sense of Fairness, Altruism as Early as 15 Months

ScienceDaily (Oct. 10, 2011) — A new study presents the first evidence that a basic sense of fairness and altruism appears in infancy. Babies as young as 15 months perceived the difference between equal and unequal distribution of food, and their awareness of equal rations was linked to their willingness to share a toy.

Social Psychology

Big city got you down? Stress study may show why

NEW YORK – This may come as no surprise to residents of New York City and other big urban centers: Living there can be bad for your mental health.

Social Psychology

Acts of Kindness Spread Surprisingly Easily: Just a Few People Can Make a Difference

ScienceDaily (Mar. 10, 2010) — For all those dismayed by scenes of looting in disaster-struck zones, whether Haiti or Chile or elsewhere, take heart: Good acts -- acts of kindness, generosity and cooperation -- spread just as easily as bad. And it takes only a handful of individuals to really make a difference.

Social Psychology

What you see is what you do: Risky behaviors linked to risk-glorifying media exposure

WASHINGTON – Exposure via the media to activities such as street racing, binge drinking and unprotected sex is linked to risk-taking behaviors and attitudes, according to a new analysis of more than 25 years of research.

Social Psychology

Bitter tastes make you more judgemental

Don't drink and judge - bitter tastes alter your moral compass, making you more judgemental.

Social Psychology

Is crime a virus or a beast?

Stanford study shows the word you pick can frame the debate on how to fight it

Social Psychology

Unhappy People Watch TV, Happy People Read/Socialize

Newswise — A new study by sociologists at the University of Maryland concludes that unhappy people watch more TV, while people who describe themselves as very happy spend more time reading and socializing. The study appears in the December issue of the journal "Social Indicators Research."

Social Psychology

Female Social Sensitivity and Effective Problem Solving

Cambridge, MA, USA. Researchers have documented the existence of collective intelligence among groups of people who cooperate well, showing that such intelligence extends beyond the cognitive abilities of the groups' individual members, while linking the tendency for effective cooperation to the number of women in a group.

Social Psychology

Intuition Only Works Between Two People

A new scientific research shows that two people can learn to cooperate intuitively – even without communication or a clear intention to coordinate, but larger groups need to communicate.

Social Psychology

Why happy couples start to sound alike

People match each other’s language styles more during happy periods of their relationship than at other times, according to new research.

Social Psychology

People Are Cautious in Asking Help from Their Community, Online Gift Exchange Study Finds

People are cautious in exchanging favours and items with other people in their community. Researchers, who studied an online gift exchange service, say that many people buy services because it does not occur to them that someone in their community could help them or they are too shy to ask for a favour.

Social Psychology

It's the Little Things: Everyday Gratitude as a Booster Shot for Romantic Relationships

ScienceDaily (May 24, 2010) — Our busy lives sometimes feel like they are spinning out of control, and we lose track of the little things we can do to add meaning to our lives and make our loved ones feel appreciated. A new article in Personal Relationships points the way to the methods of gratitude we can use to give a boost to our romantic relationships, and help us achieve and maintain satisfaction with our partners

Social Psychology

Robin Dunbar: we can only ever have 150 friends at most…

Evolutionary anthropologist Robin Dunbar tells Aleks Krotoskiwhy even Facebook cannot expand our true social circle: our brains just aren't big enough to cope

Social Psychology

Being near nature improves physical, mental health

Being outside in nature makes people feel more alive, finds a series of studies published in the June 2010 issue of the Journal of Environmental Psychology. And that sense of increased vitality exists above and beyond the energizing effects of physical activity and social interaction that are often associated with our forays into the natural world, the studies show.

Social Psychology

Weekends Are Good For You, Study Finds

Just about everybody – even workaholics – should look forward to the weekend, when most people get a mood boost, a new study suggests.

Social Psychology

Teamwork done right: New study sheds light on how to avoid destructive conflict

Experts agree that when it comes to teamwork, constructive conflict can result in better decisions and performance. When teams develop ideas together, debate differing perspectives, and synthesize those perspectives, the resulting group decision is often superior to a decision made by one person. But what about destructive conflict – when personalities clash, rivalries erupt, emotions flare, and the whole dynamic turns bad?

Social Psychology

New research by economists at the Universities of Warwick and Oxford has provided surprising information on just how much people hate a winner. It also shows what lengths human beings are prepared to go to damage a winner out of a sense of envy or fairness.

Social Psychology

Why teens take risks

PARIS - UNPROTECTED sex, wild rides on a motorbike, smoking, drugs or alcohol - the litany of risk-taking by teenagers is famously long. But what drives it? The answer could lie with adolescents' hypersensitivity to signals that unleash dopamine, a powerful brain chemical that underpins the pleasure from a reward, US psychologists suggest.

Social Psychology

Cooperative Behavior Meshes With Evolutionary Theory

ScienceDaily (Apr. 7, 2009) — One of the perplexing questions raised by evolutionary theory is how cooperative behavior, which benefits other members of a species at a cost to the individual, came to exist.

Social Psychology

Titanic study: It takes time to do the right thing Researchers learn about social norms in crises by comparing the Titanic and Lusitania sinkings

Researchers learn about social norms in crises by comparing the Titanic and Lusitania sinkings

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